Top 10 ‘FINAL FANTASY XIV’ Songs

One of the most relevant MMOs of its generation, FINAL FANTASY XIV carries a heavy name over its shoulders. It lives up to many expectations people have of the...
FINAL FANTASY XIV

One of the most relevant MMOs of its generation, FINAL FANTASY XIV carries a heavy name over its shoulders. It lives up to many expectations people have of the FINAL FANTASY franchise, such as beautiful graphics and designs, a convoluted story that gets better as you progress, and a detailed world filled with singular characters. On top of it all, A Realm Reborn has one of the most mesmerizing soundtracks in the whole franchise. Those Who Fight and To Zanarkand sure are memorable, and who could forget FINAL FANTASY XIII‘s Saber’s Edge? But few entries in the series managed to deliver a soundtrack as soothing, fitting, and consistent as XIV.

FINAL FANTASY XIV marks the return of composer Nobuo Uematsu to the acclaimed franchise. All the charm of previous iterations was brought back to life in 2010 with tracks such as The Twin Faces of Fate and the iconic Navigator’s Glory. A re-release and an expansion later, the MMORPG continues to inspire its players, its compositions having evolved into more ethereal tones fitting the world of Eorzea as it is today.

As FINAL FANTASY fans and in light of Stormblood, we’ve decided to list our favorite FFXIV songs. From 1.0 to Heavensward, these are tunes you have to listen to once you’re offline so that you can thoroughly appreciate them.

In no particular order, these are our favorite songs from FINAL FANTASY XIV:

Serenity (Black Shroud Theme)

Album: A Realm Reborn

Starting an MMO is a unique experience, especially when it’s a unique game in a way or another. Regardless of where players start FINAL FANTASY XIV, their journeys will take them to the lush city-state of Gridania, located in the heart of Eorzea in a forest called Black Shroud. Upon exiting the city during the day, the player may be greeted to the natural wonders of the forest by a soothing tune worthy of everyone’s time. Running through the roads, taking part in FATEs, and attending Levequests seems a waste when this song is playing in the background.

Twilight Over Thanalan (Thanalan 1.0 Theme)

Album: Before Meteor

Prior to the calamity, the dry plains of Thanalan were extensive and more labyrinth-like. Western Thanalan even had two levels, one that today takes us to Vesper Bay and another consisting of the formations up above. Upon exiting the beautiful Ul’dah, players would have gusts of sandstorm punching them in the face at the soothing sound of Twilight Over Thanalan. The track carries a sad yet hopeful melody in contrast to the cheerful Freedom (La Noscea’s theme) and the sinister Whisper of the Land (Black Shroud). It can still be heard in 2.0 when you start a new game in Ul’dah, as well as other key moments where it plays for a few seconds.

Poison Ivy (Saint Mocianne’s Arboretum Theme)

Album: Heavensward

The Dravanian Hinterlands is an area those who have finished the Heavensward storyline are quite familiar with. Ahead of the Sharalyan ruins lies Idyllshire, a settlement that, much like Revenant’s Toll, grows by the day. At the heart of the Answering Quarter, just across the Thallak River, rests Saint Mocianne’s Arboretum—a facility that is now overrun by morbols, wasps, and other such fiends. Its outer shell has been burst by a gigantic tree, making it a striking structure this side of Dravania. Inside, the Warriors of Light are faced with more plants than they can count and a calm tune that doesn’t reflect the dangers lurking within. Poison Ivy fits the dungeon like a glove, providing a strange sense of serenity amidst the nefarious foes.

Order Yet Undeciphered (Azys Lla Theme)

Album: Heavensward

Quoting 2013’s Enemy (based on a novel by José Saramago, directed by Denis Villeneuve, and starring Jake Gyllenhaal), Azys Lla’s theme is often a surprise to those visiting the Allagan facility for the first time. Whereas previous Heavensward maps feature soothing themes, most of which follow a specific motif, Azys Lla presents an aggressive song that inspires urgency and reminds us how advanced the Allagans were.

The Corpse Hall (Odin Theme)

Album: A Realm Reborn

“As you wander among the thick trees, the sky darkens and debris floats all around you. You press on forward, praying this not to be the beginning of another end. The settlement comes into view and as you turn around a corner, a band of chocobos passes you through, nearly sticking your body to the ground. Armored warriors and wise-looking sages mount them, hasting towards The Matron’s Lethe. As you pay closer attention, you hear battle cries coming from Sorrel Haven, followed by an eerie show of light.”

These adventurers were making their way to a fierce battle against the primal Odin, a fearsome rider clad in dark armor and mounting a towering horse. The weather Tension is a sign that he is wandering the Black Shroud and upon joining the FATE, the theme The Corpse Hall starts playing. The full track is long (over ten minutes) and repetitive, but a few instances of it perfectly summarize the fight’s intensity.

Ultima (Ultima Weapon Theme)

Album: A Realm Reborn

The end of A Realm Reborn sees players putting an end to Garlean oppression in Eorzea. The plan put together by Alphinaud is a success and the Warriors of Light must then face Gaius van Baelsar in the Praetorium. The general has control over the Ultima Weapon, an Allagan construct so powerful that primals pose it no threat. The fight against Ultima is divided into two phases, with the second phase cheering the warriors with the eponymous song, a powerful composition filled with breathtaking moments.

Primogenitor (Midgardsormr Theme)

Album: Before the Fall

Not a lot of players pay attention to the 7th Astral Era scenario (the chain of quests linking A Realm Reborn to Heavensward) after they realize half of it is comprised of unnecessary fetch quests. Upon reaching the Keeper of the Lake dungeon, however, the decision to skip every cutscene seems idiotic as the elder dragon Midgardsormr (or his aetherial form) awakens for an entertaining boss fight. The theme playing in the arena is as strange and impactful as facing the spirit of a dead dragon king. Its motif was later reused in Heavensward for the track Borderless, the flying mount theme.

From the Depths (Sastasha Theme)

Album: A Realm Reborn

The first dungeon in A Realm Reborn, Sastasha is a dark and humid place where a band of pirates resides. Upon entering, players are greeted with a few encounters and a tune that seems to tease something grand. Starting slowly, From the Depths builds up to a satisfying conclusion. Although short, the track’s composition achieves the desired effect when The Promise of Plunder starts playing with every minor encounter.

The Twin Faces of Fate (Ul’dah 1.0 Theme)

Album: Before Meteor

Whereas A Realm Reborn is punctuated by more ethereal themes, the original release of FINAL FANTASY XIV (2010) had more diversity. Many tracks present on the album Before Meteor succeed in bringing back the atmosphere of older entries in the franchise. Such is the case of The Twin Faces of Fate, Ul’dah’s theme in 1.0. While The Forest’s Pulse sounds much more old-school, Ul’dah’s original theme felt familiar and fresh at the same time. It contrasts with the themes for Limsa Lominsa (Navigator’s Glory) and Gridania (Born of the Boughs), which are far more cheerful.

Answers (1.0 Theme)

Album: Before Meteor

Nothing in the history of video games (but especially MMOs) was as epic as the end of FINAL FANTASY XIV. The title was a major failure and although Naoki Yoshida and his team implemented relevant changes and features, it was nowhere near what it should’ve been. When the genius behind A Realm Reborn suggested rebuilding the game from the ground up, Square Enix could’ve ordered 1.0 to be shut down immediately. Instead, they continued supporting the version whilst developing 2.0 at the side.

1.0’s story shifted, preparing the stage for 2.0. An eerie arrangement of Answers could be heard everywhere in Eorzea as Dalamud approached the land. Finally, with the end of 1.23b, a trailer depicting the Battle of Carteneau and the fall of Dalamud shocked fans as the original arrangement of FFXIV‘s theme narrated the destruction brought by the elder primal Bahamut. 1.0 was dead and it went out in great style.

Bonus Track

Whether you’re a dedicated FINAL FANTASY XIV player or a fan of great music, which FFXIV themes do you like the most? Let us know in the comments below what you think of our list and which songs would be in your top 10.

Categories
DiscussionFinal Fantasy XIVJRPGListsMMORPGPCPlayStation 3Playstation 4Square EnixSteam

Born and raised in Northeastern Brazil, Gabriel didn't grow up with video games as many of his colleagues. However, his dedication and love for the industry make up for his late start in the gaming world. Editor for MMOExaminer. Inquiries: gabecav@mmoexaminer.com
2 Comments on this post.
  • Hitokage Shinotani
    10 March 2017 at 8:49 pm
    Leave a Reply

    The fact that some of the other Primal themes aren’t on this list is shocking. Titan’s rocking anthem or Sephirot’s slamming theme being the best reason to run those extremes and they are songs I’ve listened to again and again. One particular dungeon theme that always strikes me hard is Pharos Sirius’ “A Light in the Storm” which is hauntingly beautiful with a full choir singing during it.

  • Steve M
    13 March 2017 at 1:55 pm
    Leave a Reply

    Surprised not to see the theme from weeping city of mhach mentioned (particularly the battle version) 🙂

  • Leave a Reply

    *

    *